Paper,

Mandrágora

Camilo V4

COMING SOON

Gothic realism, tropical horror, tragicomedy, bloody text , science fiction; Mandrágora is an unclassified novel, a splendid literary object that surprises and traps on each page. M, imbued with a mysterious illness, wanders between clandestine Miami doctors’ offices, as he struggles to keep the fragile balance between his dark appetites, his family life and his job at a big transnational. A hidden enigma in a pornographic video embarks M on a delirious journey, called to mark his destination.

“Camilo Pino manages the language with surgical efficiency. There are no useless frills and timeouts in his prose. With marvelous skill, he combines suspense and cynicism. His texts have a rare speed and mood for our literature. Camilo does not want to be complacent, he writes as if he wants to leave the reader breathless. And it succeeds.” -Alberto Barrera-Tyszka.

0no comment
Paper,

En el Lost ‘n’ Found

Junot Díaz has said that Santiago Vaquera-Vásquez is a “literary comet” that “impresses and illuminates” and leaves the reader moved. In this collection of short stories filled with wanderlust, Vaquera-Vásquez emphasizes those very personal relationships, especially those of love – the love that becomes obsessive and is doomed to fail – as well as the loss of love, in order to show how people try to connect with others. The three main narrators, two cousins and a friend, from the same small town in northern California, travel because it is all they know how to do. On their journeys, they think about their life as Hispanics in the United States and the many obstacles that Latinos here have faced as they search for a place where they can feel that they belong.

0no comment
Paper,

Grand Nocturno

 

A sad/melancholic ESL instructor teaches English to Puerto Rican soldiers who have enlisted and are on their way to Viet Nam. At the same time, he dreams about writing the “great American novel.” A serial killer – a truck driver – whose route takes him through the Big Sur area of California and who has all kinds of bizarre ideas about how Elvis Presley planned his own death. A tale about the encounter between a con man who sells blood to clinics in New York and a once famous tango dancer is set in the Caribbean of the 1950s and involves Juan Perón. A letter from far away reveals rampant crime and prostitution amidst a nostalgic look at Buenos Aires at the close of the 20th century. The story of two popes who dress as beggars and set out early each morning to look for young immigrant boys… these are just a few of the very personal stories that are included in Grand Nocturno.

With profound psychological insight and a great diversity of stylistic devices, Vera writes of the precariousness of those who have no other shelter than the night and its infinity of stars.

“A disturbing collection of stories. Vera Alvarez ‘s prose oozes authenticity on all four sides, lived life from within.” -José Abreu Felippe

0no comment
Paper,

Lado B

 

LADO B WebLado B is the story of Yaneira, a young woman who wants to escape her life as a prostitute and open a beauty salon. In order to obtain the money needed to do this, she decides to marry Carmona, an illegal immigrant who has lived in Miami for seven years. Both she and Carmona see an opportunity in each other as well as the only possibility of becoming successful in a country where, as immigrants, they have never felt welcome.

The preparations for the wedding take place on the street corners, in the cafeterias, and in the bars along Washington Avenue, Collins, and Española Way. Each day brings some small pleasures as well as lots of unhappiness to these two.

“A true picture of Miami today.” -Edmundo Paz Soldán.

0no comment
Paper,

Viaje One Way

41MlhpPlJJL._SX322_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg

Miami, Florida Everyone talks about this southernmost major city of the United States. Now, at last, Miami has its own book. Viaje One Way (A One-Way Journey) is the first literary anthology by authors from Miami to be published in the 21st century. Writers from different countries in Latin America and from Spain who have become assimilated yet still share commonalities reveal in their writings a Miami that is much more complex than is generally thought.

Authors such as José Ignacio Valenzuela (Chile), Eli Bravo (Venezuela), Rosana Ubanell (Spain), Gastón Virkel (Argentina), Rodolfo Pérez Valero (Cuba), Rossana Montoya (Peru), Camilo Pino (Venezuela), José Abreu Felippe (Cuba), Carlos Gámez Pérez (Spain), Andrés Hernández Alende (Cuba), Vera (Argentina), and Pedro Medina León (Peru) have contributed to this anthology.

“Viaje One Way puts a microphone to the voices of those whose lives we can most closely relate to, yet don’t hear enough from”  —Allan Guzmán.

0no comment